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October 5, 2011
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Giant by duster132 Giant by duster132
Painted with Photoshop. :)
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Daily Deviation

Given 2011-10-29
Giant by ~duster132 looks quiet and calm, but it's evident that there's something wrong with this aparently warm landscape... A great concept! ( Suggested by Rosella-of-Daventry and Featured by Atramina )
:iconericsilvershroud:
EricSilvershroud Featured By Owner Jun 20, 2014
Awesome.
Reply
:iconjamesday26:
jamesday26 Featured By Owner May 2, 2014
This is sick
Reply
:iconbasement-aviator:
Basement-Aviator Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is really cool.
The landscape looks like a photo from the thumbnail!
Reply
:iconspirito666:
Spirito666 Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2013  Student Writer
epic oo
Reply
:iconfluffy-badders:
Fluffy-Badders Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2013  Student General Artist
That's terrifying and ominous..  Awesome!
Reply
:iconaymendj:
aymendj Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
Prettiful.
Reply
:iconrustyjoints:
RustyJoints Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2013  Professional General Artist
I really Love That.
Great Stuff.
Reply
:iconorion113:
Orion113 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
The Jeep shook violently as we drove over another ridge. So rocky was the terrain on this planet that mag-lev suspension was standard on all ground vehicles, and even with that, Marcelline and I were being shaken like can of aerosol.
"What's GPS say?"
"Still on course, about two minutes away." Another violent bump sent the handheld flying out of my hands and into the back seat.
"Couldn't we have taken a shuttle?"
"Airborne vehicles aren't allowed close to it."
"Well how close are you planning on getting?!"
"Daryl, you've been here five months and you still haven't seen this thing, I'm sorry, but I absolutely can't allow that." She beamed. She was enjoying herself just a little too much, I thought.
I'd been here six months actually. She was forgetting quarantine in orbit. Someday soon, this world would get a proper orbital station, there may already be one on its way. But even trapped on that ship for a month, I had been hard at work on the project.
"I've seen the stills and the videos. Hell, I've even watched live feed of it already. I get it. It's big, it's old, it's mysterious. I don't think putting are selves in danger is going to change that."
"Well think again!"
We flew over the edge of a small depression, landing hard, nearly spinning out and sending the deserting GPS sailing into the back of my head.
"What's it say now?" She asked, as I got a hold of the traitorous device. It took me a few tries to get it right-side-up.
"It says...it says that it's...behind us?"
Marcelline slammed on the brakes and turned the car sharply too the side. With the huge cloud of dust around us, it wasn't surprising that we hadn't seen it already.
"Exhale. Trust me, you'll want the space." She grinned, as the dust slowly cleared our line of sight.
At first I couldn't make it out I saw a shape of something, but it was not the machine, perhaps a rock formation?
"Oh!" I gasped. I was right, it was not the machine. It was its leg, only a mile or two away. I sat there in stunned silence for a moment, taking it all in. The sheer enormity of it. The eerie shape of it. The resounding quake of every slow lumbering footstep. I had known nothing until this point.
"It's...it's so big! I hadn't...even with scale models..."
Marcy only grinned. I opened the door and set my boots on the dusty ground.
"I never...and this thing is really that old?"
"Probably older." She said, getting out of her door as well. "A thousand years is the age of the most ancient footprint we've been able to definitively date. That doesn't mean it never made any older ones. However, we certainly haven't found any thousand year old ruins of the people who built it."
"Which suggests either there were never any buildings to fall into ruin, or that they were here so long ago that there is nothing left." I responded.
"Spoken like a true anthropologist." She smiled. "But enough of my field of expertise, how about yours. Do you and your team really think you can understand how this thing is built?"
I gazed up at the giant. So strangely close to human form. The first evidence of intelligent life we had ever discovered.
"An hour ago, I would have said yes in a heartbeat. Now...I'm not so sure."
Together, we watched it take a few more giant steps, so slow were its movements relative to its size, it was easy to forget how many miles it had moved just since we started watching.
"Do you think its lonely?" She asked.
I gave her a funny look. "That's not the first thought that comes to mind, no. Where did that come from, exactly."
She shrugged. "Intuition. Whether or not there were any more of them here at some point, or if its creators ever made contact with it, right now it's the only thing left of its entire civilization. That would make me lonely."
I furrowed my brow.
"I think it would make me vengeful."
Suddenly, the giant stopped where it was, its trailing foot coming to rest next to its counterpart. Then, after a moment of stillness, the giant's enormous, inhuman face turned directly towards us and stared.
Our breaths caught in our throats, and our hearts hammered on our ribs like blacksmiths. Never before had the giant ever acknowledged our presence on this planet before in any way; it had ignored every near flyby, every radio signal we sent at it, every giant message or image burnt into the dry ground before it.
All of us had been hoping for this moment, but I found now that I was nothing less than terrified.

Before I had the chance to lose consciousness from lack of breathing, the giant soundlessly turned, and continued its solemn march.
We stood there for the next few hours, until the sun had roasted our necks, and the radio in the car had been ignored for so long that those on the other end were considering sending out a search party. We stood there until the last bit of the giant's head had disappeared behind the curve of the horizon. We stood there until we were no longer paralyzed by fear and wonder, then we scrambled into the car, and made a mad dash back to base.

I knew that day that mankind was at a turning point in its history, though I did not know then whether this was the end of the beginning, or the beginning of the end.
Reply
:iconorion113:
Orion113 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
And of course I had to ruin it by double posting. XD My bad, everyone.
Reply
:iconorion113:
Orion113 Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2013
The Jeep shook violently as we drove over another ridge. So rocky was the terrain on this planet that mag-lev suspension was standard on all ground vehicles, and even with that, Marcelline and I were being shaken like can of aerosol.
"What's GPS say?"
"Still on course, about two minutes away." Another violent bump sent the handheld flying out of my hands and into the back seat.
"Couldn't we have taken a shuttle?"
"Airborne vehicles aren't allowed close to it."
"Well how close are you planning on getting?!"
"Daryl, you've been here five months and you still haven't seen this thing, I'm sorry, but I absolutely can't allow that." She beamed. She was enjoying herself just a little too much, I thought.
I'd been here six months actually. She was forgetting quarantine in orbit. Someday soon, this world would get a proper orbital station, there may already be one on its way. But even trapped on that ship for a month, I had been hard at work on the project.
"I've seen the stills and the videos. Hell, I've even watched live feed of it already. I get it. It's big, it's old, it's mysterious. I don't think putting are selves in danger is going to change that."
"Well think again!"
We flew over the edge of a small depression, landing hard, nearly spinning out and sending the deserting GPS sailing into the back of my head.
"What's it say now?" She asked, as I got a hold of the traitorous device. It took me a few tries to get it right-side-up.
"It says...it says that it's...behind us?"
Marcelline slammed on the brakes and turned the car sharply too the side. With the huge cloud of dust around us, it wasn't surprising that we hadn't seen it already.
"Exhale. Trust me, you'll want the space." She grinned, as the dust slowly cleared our line of sight.
At first I couldn't make it out I saw a shape of something, but it was not the machine, perhaps a rock formation?
"Oh!" I gasped. I was right, it was not the machine. It was its leg, only a mile or two away. I sat there in stunned silence for a moment, taking it all in. The sheer enormity of it. The eerie shape of it. The resounding quake of every slow lumbering footstep. I had known nothing until this point.
"It's...it's so big! I hadn't...even with scale models..."
Marcy only grinned. I opened the door and set my boots on the dusty ground.
"I never...and this thing is really that old?"
"Probably older." She said, getting out of her door as well. "A thousand years is the age of the most ancient footprint we've been able to definitively date. That doesn't mean it never made any older ones. However, we certainly haven't found any thousand year old ruins of the people who built it."
"Which suggests either there were never any buildings to fall into ruin, or that they were here so long ago that there is nothing left." I responded.
"Spoken like a true anthropologist." She smiled. "But enough of my field of expertise, how about yours. Do you and your team really think you can understand how this thing is built?"
I gazed up at the giant. So strangely close to human form. The first evidence of intelligent life we had ever discovered.
"An hour ago, I would have said yes in a heartbeat. Now...I'm not so sure."
Together, we watched it take a few more giant steps, so slow were its movements relative to its size, it was easy to forget how many miles it had moved just since we started watching.
"Do you think its lonely?" She asked.
I gave her a funny look. "That's not the first thought that comes to mind, no. Where did that come from, exactly."
She shrugged. "Intuition. Whether or not there were any more of them here at some point, or if its creators ever made contact with it, right now it's the only thing left of its entire civilization. That would make me lonely."
I furrowed my brow.
"I think it would make me vengeful."
Suddenly, the giant stopped where it was, its trailing foot coming to rest next to its counterpart. Then, after a moment of stillness, the giant's enormous, inhuman face turned directly towards us and stared.
Our breaths caught in our throats, and our hearts hammered on our ribs like blacksmiths. Never before had the giant ever acknowledged our presence on this planet before in any way; it had ignored every near flyby, every radio signal we sent at it, every giant message or image burnt into the dry ground before it.
All of us had been hoping for this moment, but I found now that I was nothing less than terrified.

Before I had the chance to lose consciousness from lack of breathing, the giant soundlessly turned, and continued its solemn march.
We stood there for the next few hours, until the sun had roasted our necks, and the radio in the car had been ignored for so long that those on the other end were considering sending out a search party. We stood there until the last bit of the giant's head had disappeared behind the curve of the horizon. We stood there until we were no longer paralyzed by fear and wonder, then we scrambled into the car, and made a mad dash back to base.

I knew that day that mankind was at a turning point in its history, though I did not know then whether this was the end of the beginning, or the beginning of the end.
Reply
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